Basic Black

Basic Black (WhiteRosesArt.com)

Basic Black by Heather Miller

 

Price:  $40.00
Year: 2015
Size:  24.25″ x  6″ x  ~1″

Basic Black was created using yarn, leather cord, hemp cord, ribbon, glass tile, beads, and jewelry pieces mounted on wood.

[NOTE: Shipping, if required, will be invoiced separately]
This piece is currently on exhibition at Artomatic 2017 in Crystal City, Virginia until May 7, 2017.

The Story:

Basic Black is part of a series of simple pieces using yarn, string, cord, or twine as a base.  After creating Vintage, I realized when I create these pieces my mind is blissfully quiet.  While they seem simple to create, the challenge comes in making sure each of the strings is straight as you wind around the board.  If my mind wanders too much, I change the tension (pulling too hard or not hard enough) or start overlapping at the edges.  Either problem results in having to unwind and start over.

Basic Black Detail (WhiteRosesArt.com)

Basic Black –  Detail Image

I have no idea why I created black-on-black piece.  I think I just really wanted to use those black glass tiles, and the black yarn I bought.  Sometimes I really just like working color-on-color.  Deep Water was born out of the same instinct.  Working with a single color can be very challenging and enlightening.  It forces me to think about all the subtle shades of a single color.  When you work with multiple colors a lot, sometimes you forget about all the amazing shades a single color can have.  Personally, I know I tend to get ‘stuck’ working with a regular range of, say, blues for example.  Doing monochromatic work helps remind me that hundreds of shades exist and I should use them more often.  Perhaps this is less of a challenge for artists who had a proper education in color theory.  While I have a BFA, my university did not offer any of the more useful classes like color theory.

There is one important thing to note as you look at the photos of Basic Black.  While the contrast comes out well in the photo, it’s not quite that pronounced in most real-life lighting.   It’s still a striking piece just keep in mind that good lighting is important for this one.

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